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The Occupied Dream
History & Culture

The Occupied Dream

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Community Colleges and the American Social Order

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Community Colleges and the American Social Order

From the earliest days of the Republic, Americans have possessed an abiding faith that theirs is a land of possibility. For in contrast to the magnificence-certain societies of Europe, America turned into seen as a place of limitless opportunities, an area wherein difficult paintings and potential could receive their just reward. From Thomas Jefferson’s “herbal aristocracy of expertise” to Ronald Reagan’s “possibility society,” the belief that America became and must continue to be—a land wherein people of ambition and tal- ent ought to upward thrust as far as their capacities would take them has been critical to the country wide identity. Abraham Lincoln expressed this deeply rooted countrywide commit- ment to equality of possibility succinctly whilst, in a special message to Congress rapidly after the onset of the Civil War, he defined as a “leading object of the authorities for whose lifestyles we contend” to “find the money for all an unfettered begin,  and a fair danger in the race of lifestyles.” '

Throughout tons of the 19th century, the notion that the USA became a nation blessed with specific possibilities for person development turned into huge amongst Americans and Europeans alike. The cornerstone of this notion became a surprisingly wide distribution of assets (generally confined, to be sure, to grownup white men) and seemingly abundant possibilities in commerce and agri- tradition to build up more. But with the upward thrust of mammoth businesses and the closing of the frontier in the decades after the Civil War, the fate of the “self- made guy”—that heroic discern who, although of modest origins, triumphed in the aggressive market via sheer ability and determination—came to be ques- tioned. In particular, the fundamental modifications then occurring inside the American economic system—the increase of large commercial enterprises, the attention of proper- tyless employees within the state’s cities, and the emergence of monopolies—made the image of the hardworking stockboy who rose to the pinnacle seem an increasing number of like a relic of a vanished generation. The unheard of spate of success books that appeared among 1880 and 1885 (books bearing such titles as The Law oJ Success,